Comet P41/Tutttle-Giacobini

Comet P41/Tutttle-Giacobini
Comet P41/Tutttle-Giacobini

A quick shot of a Comet P41/Tutttle-Giacobini that was passing through the constellation of Ursa Major in March 2017.

Image taken on 25th of March 2017 with my Nikon D500 at ISO 5000 and exposures of 40 seconds using SkyWatcher 250/1200 instead of some camera lens.

Some of other images taken at the same astronomical event – annual Messier Marathon observing competition:

M13 in Hercules
M51 in Ursa Major


Catalina C/2013 US10

The comet has passed perihelion on Nov. 15th and after that begun its climb into morning twilight. Catalina should be easily visible in ordinary binoculars. Watch for it to gradually brighten through the end of the year, peaking around magnitude +5.5 (just barely naked eye) in late December and early January, when it will be well-placed high in the northeastern sky.

Here are some key dates with celestial destiny for Comet US10 Catalina for the next few months:

  • 7. December — Comet passes less than 5 degrees from the Venus and waning crescent Moon.
  • 1. January — Comet passes less than 0.5 degree from the bright (0.04 magnitude) star Arcturus in Bootes.
  • 12. January — Closest to Earth.
  • 14., 15. January — Comet passes less than 1 degree from the bright star Alkaid in Ursa Major.
  • 16. January — Comet passes less than 2 degrees from one of the brightest visible spiral galaxies M110.
  • 17. January — Comet passes less than 3.5 degrees from the bright double star Mizar in Ursa Major.
Comet C/2013 US10 Catalina, imaged on 11 December 2015 at 4:50 UT.

C/2014 Q2 Lovejoy

Just few days before it crosses perihelion, comet should be at its brightest. It is easily visible to naked eye even in moderate light polluted sky.

Comets current location is in constellation Taurus, moving into Triangulum and Andromeda constellation by month’s end.

C/2014 Q2 Lovejoy, 12 January 2015 ~20:00 UT
Equipment: Nikon D3000, Tamron 70-300 @ 300mm, f/5.6 ISO800, stack of images 25x30s

C/2012 F6 Lemmon July 2013

Four months after its perihelion the comet is still quite bright with 5′ coma but no visible tail. It can be observed with binoculars and small telescopes. Currently located high in northern skies in constellation Cepheus.

Object: C/2012 F6 Lemmon
Date: 17 July 2013 at 23:10UT
FOV: 33′ x 30′
Exposure: stacked 8x30s, over period of 12min
ISO: 3200
Equipment: Nikon D3000, HEQ5, 250/1200 scope
Processing: Photoshop

C/2011 L4 Panstarrs March 2013

Object: C2011 L4 (PANSTARRS)
Date: 15 March 2013 at 18:24UT
Exposure: 10s
ISO: 3200
Lens: 18-55 @ 55 f/5.6
Equipment: Nikon D3000
Date: 15 March 2013 at 18:21UT
Exposure: 10s
ISO: 800
Lens: 18-55 @ 18 f/3.5
Equipment: Nikon D3000
Date: 19 March 2013 at 18:29UT
Exposure: 10s
ISO: 1600
Lens: 18-55 @ 55 f/5.6
Equipment: Nikon D3000
Date: 19 March 2013 at 18:22UT
Exposure: 3s
ISO: 1600
Lens: 18-55 @ 18 f/3.5
Equipment: Nikon D3000